APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS : Congrès ICPP4 : “T12P08 – Penal Institutions and “Egalitarian Norms””, 26-28 juin 2019, Montréal — LIMITE : 30/01/2019

Organisateurs

Camille Lancelevée, Jérémie Gauthier (fellow ICM Integer), Mathilde Darley (fellow ICM Integer)

Infos pratiques

  • Contacts : https://lnkd.in/gYSEj6q
  • Date limite de soumission : 30 janvier 2019
  • page source : http://www.ippapublicpolicy.org/conference/icpp4-montreal-2019/panel-list/10/panel/penal-institutions-and-egalitarian-norms/881

Présentation

This panel aims to gather papers on the implementation and limits of public policies on “diversity”, “equality” or “anti-discrimination”[1] in criminal institutions (police, justice, prison). How do penal institutions adjust to egalitarian norms (Bereni, Jacquemart, 2019) promoted through national and international public policies?

Anglo-Saxon research in sociology and criminology has focused for several decades on the categorization of clients by professionals in the criminal justice system as well as on individual and systemic discrimination produced by law enforcement (Epp et al., 2015) or by the sentencing process (Hood, 1992). These research concerns emerged later in other contexts (in France, for example), where social sciences have only recently paid increased attention to selection biases of criminal policies when defining their target population groups (Beyens, Vanhamme, 2007) – biases due to gender (Cardi, 2009; Vuattoux, 2014), social origin (Herpin, 1977; Wacquant, 2009; Gautron, Retière, 2013) or ethnoracial characteristics (Jobard et al., 2012; Fassin, 2015). This scientific endeavor has developed in parallel to mobilizations denouncing the discriminatory biases in the penal system.

In this context, the implementation of public policies of “diversity” or “equality” within penal institutions seems to have been neglected by research, unlike other sectors of public action such as educational policies (Sabbagh, 2003). However, through legislation aimed at combating discrimination and/or promoting equality in the working world (McCann, 1994), the diffusion of “egalitarian standards” also affects penal institutions. This can be illustrated by recruiting policies promoting women (Malochet, 2005; Pruvost, 2007), ethnoracial minorities (Gauthier, Lévy, 2015) or sexual minorities (Bernstein, Kostelac, 2002). This diffusion can also result from the creation of services dedicated to the “fight against discrimination” or specific professional associations (e.g. black police associations, LGBT police associations). In addition, this attention to “diversity” and “equality” is also marked by the implementation of mechanisms or measures to reduce the discriminations experienced by the users of these institutions (e. g.  services dedicated to receiving complaints of homophobic aggression in the police, accommodations for people with disabilities in prison, etc.). The panel’s papers will test the hypotheses formulated in other institutional contexts: the gaps between institutional discourses, mechanisms dedicated to their implementation and their concrete functioning (“organizational decoupling”, Meyer, Rowan, 1977) can best be understood through acknowledging both the acceptance in principle and the resistance of the management towards egalitarian rhetoric developed by reform-minded elites (Bereni, Jacquemart, 2019). The panel also welcomes methodological questions: the papers will provide reflective feedback on the extent to which gender and ethno-racial characteristics of the researcher condition the access to those research fields as well as the production of empirical data and, eventually, the scientific results.
[1] These policies include an increasing number of criteria: race, gender, sexuality, philosophical and religious beliefs, disability, etc.

 

This panel aims to gather papers on the implementation and limits of public policies on “diversity”, “equality” or “anti-discrimination” within institutions of the criminal justice system (police, justice, prison). These egalitarian standards can be illustrated by recruitment policies promoting women, racial minorities or LGBT agents. This diffusion can also result from the creation of services dedicated to the “fight against discrimination” or specific professional associations (e.g. black police associations, LGBT police associations). In addition, this concern for “diversity” and “equality” is also marked by the implementation of mechanisms or measures to reduce the discriminations experienced by the users of these institutions (e. g. reducing stop-and-search practices, units dedicated to receiving complaints of homophobic aggression in the police, accommodations for people with disabilities in prison, etc.). Attention will also be paid to situations of inequality that do not – or not yet – achieve sufficient social visibility to become objects of public action.

How do penal institutions adjust to the egalitarian norms promoted through national and international public policies? To which extent these norms modify national penal policies? How are these norms implemented within criminal institutions? What are the resistances against these norms? To which extent do they have effects on the biases they seek to reduce? How do they affect power relations within criminal institutions?

The papers proposed in this panel will be based on empirical data from field surveys and/or quantitative surveys. Comparative proposals (between different national contexts or integrating different types of institutions) are welcome.

The panel will focus on three topics:

– The production and dissemination of these “egalitarian norms” within penal institutions: the communications will address the question of recruitment policies, management, professional associations with egalitarian claims, the handling of conflicts related to gender and ethnicity, and resistance to these egalitarian norms within these institutions.

– The effects of these egalitarian policies: the papers will explore the effects on professional staff as well as on the “clients” of penal institutions in an intersectional perspective – i.e. focusing on the relations of gender, class, race, sexuality, and other forms of assignment and domination.

– Methodological and epistemological questions raised by gender, class and racial characteristics of social scientists working on these penal institutions: the papers will provide reflective feedback on the extent to which gender and ethno-racial characteristics of the researcher condition the access to those research fields as well as the production of empirical data and, eventually, the scientific results.